Church History is full of gems, if you just know where to look.

This post marks the beginning of a multi-part series on Church History from the time of Pentecost to the present. The purpose of this series is to make sense of our place in God’s varied and fascinating history of redemption. The aim is to trace the story of the church from its beginning until now in an attempt to find out how we got here.

As the writer Pearl S. Buck said, “If you want to understand today, you have to search yesterday.” And in like manner, George Santayana warned, “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Understanding where we come from and our place in church history can help us make sense of our lives and our roles in God’s story. Studying church history is a kind of practical version of time travel, allowing us to see the full tapestry and identify which of its threads are pulling most forcefully on us in the present.  

Church history, like all of human history, is full of amazing acts of bravery, stupidity, irony, tragedy and humor.

To that end, we will be exploring the threads that led to the formation of Pacific Crossroads Church – not the story of how we are a church plant of Redeemer NYC – but the radical, seismic turns in God’s story that led us here through the millennia. This series will cover much ground, but in the process, we will see ever more of God’s intention in human history and his faithfulness to our predecessors in the faith. We are the beneficiaries of countless brave and bold decisions of courageous Christians, and their stories are worth knowing. 

As a note to the reader at the outset, each of these entries will stand on its own, but they are best read in order, as they follow a mostly linear chronology. 

Church history, like all of human history, is full of amazing acts of bravery, stupidity, irony, tragedy and humor. For example, we will cover how Santa Claus – St. Nicholas, who was a real person – once punched the heretic Arius in the face for blasphemy at the Council of Nicaea.  

It was one of the more dramatic examples of church discipline. It turns out heresy will land you on the Naughty List.


So, without further ado, let’s look at the first seismic shift of the early church: the transition from one nation to all nations.  Click here for Episode One.